Are raw conkers edible?

'cos I've eaten about 50 of them this morning
Answers:
You must have been BONKERS to eat all those Conkers! LOL
Like acorns, no they are not.
No . horse chestnuts are not edible. Sweet chestnuts are OK - they're the ones you roast at Christmas.

I guess you're going to feel pretty sick later!
and why would you want to do that?
They are if yer alittle squirrel so bon appetit, if you're not I'll administer the last rites for you if u want.
guess you'll find out later on
Are they last years conkers..cos this years aren't out yet..either way they are toxic.

They contain a bitter, poisonous glycoside which breaks down blood proteins. This property has led to the development of the common rat poison, warfarin, extracted from clovers, which contain a similar toxin.

So..well do I need to say more!!
ur poisened dude
I like my conkers sucked.
only if your a plonker!
No they are not!!HORSE-CHESTNUTis a familiar Nova Scotian hardwood, well-known for its large, compound leaves and colourful fruit in their spiky cases. Though this fruit is similar to the edible, Sweet Chestnut, the two trees are unrelated. HORSE-CHESTNUT is toxic. Children are especially attracted by the luster of HORSE-CHESTNUTS, which were traditionally strung and struck against one another in the game of "conkers."
POISON LOCATION:
All parts of HORSE-CHESTNUTS contain toxins, especially the fruit.
POISON TYPE:
Aesculin, a bitter, poisonous glycoside which breaks down blood proteins. This property has led to the development of the common rat poison, warfarin, extracted from clovers, which contain a similar toxin.
TYPICAL POISONING SCENARIO:
Most poisonings occur from people roasting & eating the fruit, in the mistaken belief that they are the same as Sweet Chesnuts; they aren't! Some people claim you can boil the toxins out of HORSE-CHESTNUTS, then dry them & grind them into a coarse flour, but you'd have to be pretty desperate, and we don't recommend trying it. There is no risk, incidentally, in handling the tree or its fruit.
SYMPTOMS:
Chesnut poisoning is rarely fatal, but typically causes vomiting, loss of coordination, stupor, and occasionally, paralysis.
Boy,if you really have eaten the amount you say,you need to get some medical attention right away.!!
Eat one and tell us!
You're playing with fire Caine. And I'm not talking about the conkers.
Conkers are not edible and you might have a stomach ache
Conkers are like buckeyes, aren't they?

In the state of Ohio, I believe it is illegal to ingest buckeyes as it's considered disrespectful. The state's nickname is 'the Buckeye State'. The mascot of The Ohio State University is Brutus Buckeye. A crazy looking man with a giant, poisonous nut for a head. Truly bizarre. http://library.osu.edu/sites/archives/os.

At any rate, the only thing you're allowed to do with them from what I can tell is to string them into necklaces and either wear them on football game days, or hang them from the rear-view mirror in your car.

Eat them & face the wrath of crazed Buckeye fans.
what are conkers? it sounds "dirty".
Not unless you're a horse.
ask the women
no i dont fink conckers are but chestnuts are
they both kind of look the same so u mite of mixed dem up
The common horse-chestnut is cultivated for ornament but
Never for the purpose of a food supply. It is now known to be a native of Greece or the Balkan Mountains. Pickering says it was made known in 1557; Brandis, that it was cultivated in Vienna in 1576; and Emerson,
That it was introduced into the gardens of France in 1615 from
Constantinople. John Robinson says that it was known in England
about 1580. It was introduced to northeast America, says Pickering, by
European colonists. The seeds are bitter and in their ordinary condition inedible but have been used, says Balfour, as a substitute for coffee. Horse chestnut fruits are occasionally used as cattle and horse food, especially in Asia, but only after they are soaked in lime water to remove the bitterness.
 WARNING
Horse chestnut fruits are poisonous if ingested without treatment.